I’ve been blogging about my startup experience for the last 2 months and I’ve been pretty overwhelmed by the responses and engagement I’ve received thus far. Before I continue with the story, I thought I’d answer a lot of the recurring questions people have been asking about all this. Launching a startup is a mystery to a lot of people (including me) and the original goal of me writing about all this was to share my experiences, so here goes:

What does a startup CEO do all day?

That one is easy… Talk to people. A lot of people. In all seriousness, you run the company, which means…


In my last installment, I finally revealed what it is that we are actually building. Now back to the story… It was a dark and stormy night… Ok.. not really. It was late November, and Darren (our head of growth) and I had been meeting with our product council for a few months. Darren and I reached the conclusion that we knew what we had to build and it was time to start translating ideas into first low fidelity mockups, then high fidelity mockups and finally a functioning product.

Early stage startups are really a race against time. You have…


I’ve been writing about my startup for the last five weeks and haven’t said a word about what it is that we’re actually building or even what my company is called. (No it isn’t Stealth Startup). Let’s start with the company name, it’s called DataDistillr. You can check out our website at DataDistillr.com. What are we building? We are building the ultimate data analytics tool. The goal is to make the world’s data easy to use and query. How are we going to do that you ask? …


In my last article, we had just gotten word that we were getting funded, and that I required immediate surgery. (I’m fine now, Thank G-d). A little more color, at this point, I had an idea, $1.6M in the bank, not much of a team to speak of, and investors who presumably want some sort of return on their investment. I still was working at JP Morgan at this point but getting ready to give notice. The big question in my mind at this point was, “What the hell do I do now?”

The first thing I did was buy…


In my last post about startup life, I wrote about trials and tribulations around getting funding here in the DC area and how I met my mentor Todd who guided me through the next steps and then COVID hit. So it was mid-March 2020, COVID was turning everyone’s life inside out. Around the same time, my boss left at work and I was basically left in a state of limbo as to what exactly I would be doing. I had a lot of free time. Given all the uncertainty surrounding COVID, it didn’t seem especially prudent to approach investors at…


I ended my last post about my startup journey and describing my feeling about how for about four years where I had an idea, wanted to build a product but lacked resources to do so. I want to talk about that journey a bit more before we get into the actual tech that we’re working on. As a shameless teaser, we had some amazing progress on Friday and I’m really excited to start showing people, but you’ll have to wait… 🙂

Anyway, as I mentioned in the last article, I had always admired startup culture, or at least what I…


I haven’t been posting for quite some time, a fact that I know has caused much consternation to both of my readers. Anyway, the reason has been that I launched a startup! I’ve decided that I am going to shift my blog and write a bit about my experiences as a founder, dealing with investors, managing time, and everything else I’ve learned. The best part is that the story isn’t written yet, so we don’t really know how it is going to turn out! Will we flame out? Will we become the next billion dollar company? Will we get acquired…


Recently, I responded to a linkedIn article about a cyber attack on a cancer center. The person who posted it basically asked the question, why would a hacker go after something like a cancer center or a school? After reading the posts, it seemed to me that there is a lack of understanding as to why and how hackers actually do what they do.

Why Do Hackers Hack?

One of the biggest misconceptions about hacking is that people think that they are not important or that they don’t have anything that hackers want. The issue here is that people don’t understand why people hack…


photo-1501743411739-de52ea0ce6a0

For the last few years, I’ve been involved with Splunk engineering. I found this to be somewhat ironic since I’ve haven’t used Splunk as a user for a really long time. I was never a fan of the Splunk query language (SPL) for a variety of reasons, the main one being that I didn’t want to spend the time to learn a proprietary language that is about as elegant as a 1974 Ford Pinto. I had worked on a few projects over the years that involved doing machine learning on data in Splunk. which presented a major challenge. …


A Job Interview
A Job Interview
https://unsplash.com/photos/bwki71ap-y8

Realities of a Data Science Job Search

I’ve been waiting for some time to publish this, but I wanted to write about my experiences interviewing for data science jobs. Here’s my story, I worked at Booz Allen for nearly seven years but I felt it was time for a change. I very much like Booz Allen as a company and if anyone is interested in working there, please don’t hesitate to contact me. But I felt I was ready for different challenges and started looking for work elsewhere.

Now that I started a new position, I thought I’d share some observations about what I learned from interviewing…

Charles Givre

Founder of DataDistillr, Data Science enthusiast, Instructor and Apache Drill PMC Chair. Contact me at charles(at)datadistillr.com.

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